EXHIBITIONS | Oh, Railroad Bill

EXHIBITIONS | Oh, Railroad Bill

One hundred fifty years ago today, Abraham Lincoln signed into law the act that set in motion the development of the first transcontinental railroad across the United States. “Visions of Empire: The Quest for a Railroad Across America, 1840–1880,” The Huntington’s current major exhibition curated by Peter J. Blodgett, The … Continue reading

Three Ways of Looking at the Japanese Garden

Three Ways of Looking at the Japanese Garden

When The Huntington’s Japanese Garden reopens to the public on April 11 after a year-long renovation, it will be an appropriate time to reflect on its 100-year history. Kendall H. Brown says that we can understand the history of Japanese gardens in America in the past century by looking at … Continue reading

Going Public

Going Public

Today is Founder’s Day, the birthday of Henry Edwards Huntington. Each year, The Huntington commemorates the occasion with a Founder’s Day Lecture, and last week Shelley M. Bennett delivered a talk titled “Private to Public: A Family History of the Collecting and Philanthropy of Collis, Arabella, Archer, and Henry Huntington.” … Continue reading

Listening to Lincoln

Listening to Lincoln

Late last month, Harry S. Stout gave a public lecture titled “Abraham Lincoln’s Second Inaugural as America’s Sermon to the World.” Before he began his talk, though, he turned the podium over to Lincoln biographer Ronald C. White Jr., who read Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address in its entirety. “In the … Continue reading

CONFERENCES | Between Roy Ritchie and the Deep Blue Sea

CONFERENCES | Between Roy Ritchie and the Deep Blue Sea

Earlier this month, a group of historians gathered to give thanks to Robert C. Ritchie, the recently retired director of research at The Huntington. “The New Maritime History: A Conference in Honor of Roy Ritchie” paid tribute to a man who not only fostered great research but also conducted a … Continue reading