Last Men of the Revolution

Veterans Day, an occasion to honor the nation’s servicemen and women, has roots stretching back to the First World War. Yet the desire to commemorate wartime sacrifice has a much longer history. In 1864, as the Civil War continued to rage, Connecticut minister Elias Brewster Hillard travelled through New York, … Continue reading

Come What Will, Part 2

Today we bring you the second part of a post by Olga Tsapina, the Norris Foundation Curator of American Historical Manuscripts and curator of the current exhibition “A Just Cause: Voices of the American Civil War.” Continuing her post from yesterday, she recounts the final dramatic months of Abraham Lincoln’s … Continue reading

Come What Will, Part 1

Today and tomorrow we bring you a two-part piece by Olga Tsapina, the Norris Foundation Curator of American Historical Manuscripts and curator of the current exhibition “A Just Cause: Voices of the American Civil War.” In these posts she recounts the final dramatic months of Abraham Lincoln’s reelection campaign in … Continue reading

The Civil War Reflected

The Huntington Digital Library just launched a new collection—the United States Civil War. It features more than 2,000 images from our impressive holdings of Civil War materials, many of which are being displayed in two new Huntington exhibitions: “A Just Cause: Voices of the American Civil War” and “A Strange … Continue reading

The Drew Gilpin Faust Effect

Tuesday night, PBS will premiere “Death and the Civil War,” an installment of “American Experience” produced by Ric Burns and inspired by the 2008 book This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War, by Drew Gilpin Faust. The broadcast coincides with the anniversary of the Battle of Antietam, … Continue reading

EXHIBITIONS | Oh, Railroad Bill

EXHIBITIONS | Oh, Railroad Bill

One hundred fifty years ago today, Abraham Lincoln signed into law the act that set in motion the development of the first transcontinental railroad across the United States. “Visions of Empire: The Quest for a Railroad Across America, 1840–1880,” The Huntington’s current major exhibition curated by Peter J. Blodgett, The … Continue reading

Listening to Lincoln

Listening to Lincoln

Late last month, Harry S. Stout gave a public lecture titled “Abraham Lincoln’s Second Inaugural as America’s Sermon to the World.” Before he began his talk, though, he turned the podium over to Lincoln biographer Ronald C. White Jr., who read Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address in its entirety. “In the … Continue reading

LECTURES | “More Like a Sermon”

LECTURES | “More Like a Sermon”

When Abraham Lincoln completed his Second Inaugural Address in the waning days of the Civil War, Frederick Douglass remarked that “the address sounded more like a sermon than a state paper.” In a lecture at The Huntington Wednesday night, historian Harry S. Stout will explain how that speech was an … Continue reading