MR. HUNTINGTON’S GARDEN | Full Circle

MR. HUNTINGTON’S GARDEN | Full Circle

After months undergoing restoration in Kyoto, Seifu-an has arrived. Our teahouse sort of looks like the most complex kit you might ever purchase at Ikea. Thankfully, Yoshiaki Nakamura and his craftsmen (who completely restored this building during its sojourn to Kyoto) arrive soon to help us learn how it is properly assembled. Continue reading

MR. HUNTINGTON’S GARDEN | When Life Gives You Lemons, Protect Them

MR. HUNTINGTON’S GARDEN | When Life Gives You Lemons, Protect Them

Plant diseases can be a “so what” kind of thing. But how many of us will miss oranges, lemons, and limes if they completely disappear from our diets? California is being closely monitored for a bacterial disease that could severely damage citrus orchards. For the meantime, The Huntington’s citrus has not been affected. Continue reading

MR. HUNTINGTON’S GARDEN | Out of Sight, But Hardly out of Mind

MR. HUNTINGTON’S GARDEN | Out of Sight, But Hardly out of Mind

One 40-foot container on a cargo ship began its journey at Nakamura’s workshop in Kyoto, where craftsmen who had restored the wooden elements of Seifu-an (our teahouse) carefully packed them away to reassemble here at the Gardens. Simultaneously, the Japanese pond is drained and work continues behind the newly erected construction fence. Continue reading

MR. HUNTINGTON’S GARDEN | Putting the Bard in Shakespeare’s Garden

MR. HUNTINGTON’S GARDEN | Putting the Bard in Shakespeare’s Garden

While out in the Shakespeare Garden yesterday, one of the guards reminded me that April 23 (this Saturday) is the day we celebrate Shakespeare’s birthday. We have replanted the garden just in time to bring a bit more life and color to the clearing over which Shakespeare presides. Continue reading

MR. HUNTINGTON’S GARDEN | Peonies in Bloom

MR. HUNTINGTON’S GARDEN | Peonies in Bloom

In the event they never bloom so beautifully again, it is worth posting a photo of a very nice clump of herbaceous peonies that exploded in bloom this week in Liu Fang Yuan. And perhaps with a few words of encouragement, any readers who plan to visit the Gardens in the next day or so should make a journey to the Plantain Court (the main courtyard) in the Chinese garden. Continue reading