Remembering a Gentleman and Scholar

Remembering a Gentleman and Scholar

Huntington readers and staff have many fond memories of John Steadman (pictured at left, above), who was a much-loved member of our community for more than 40 years, and whose numerous publications may be found on the Library’s shelves. John’s combination of deep scholarship, selfless service, and warm fellowship made … Continue reading

First Among Huntington Librarians

First Among Huntington Librarians

It’s National Library Week (April 8–14), the perfect time to celebrate the contributions of The Huntington’s librarians, including Henry Huntington’s first: George Watson Cole. A leading bibliographer in the United States during the first quarter of the 20th century, Cole was 65 when he was hired in New York in … Continue reading

A Grand Old Flagpole

A Grand Old Flagpole

Henry Huntington must have loved the Fourth of July, because when it came to flag-waving he went to great lengths (and heights) to show his patriotic spirit. The grand old flagpole that he purchased in 1909 is 148 feet of solid Douglas fir, cut from a single tree. The metallic paint job is so convincing that most Huntington visitors have no idea the pole is made of wood. Continue reading

LECTURES | Speaking of Birthdays

LECTURES | Speaking of Birthdays

For a short month, February has a lot of big birthdays—George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Charles Darwin, to name just a few. Perhaps none is bigger (here, at least) than Henry Edwards Huntington’s. He was born Feb. 27, 1850, in Oneonta, N.Y. Since the founding of this institution, officials have commemorated the anniversary with a Founder’s Day lecture. Continue reading