Becoming America

An astonishingly rich installation of early American art provides a pre-Thanksgiving visual feast for Huntington visitors, beginning Oct. 22. That’s opening day for the new Jonathan and Karin Fielding Wing in the Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art. On view in the elegant new space designed by Frederick Fisher … Continue reading

Chinese Poetry, Painting, and Gardens

Sometimes an object comes along that has so many ties to an institution’s collecting areas, it’s hard for curators to pass it up. That’s what happened in 2014, when The Huntington acquired the Ten Bamboo Studio Manual of Calligraphy and Painting 十竹齋書畫譜 (ca. 1633–1703), a remarkable example of early Chinese … Continue reading

Pittman and Maltzan’s Visual Synergy

Visitors familiar with the exuberant, colorful, and graphically complex works of Los Angeles–based artist Lari Pittman know not to expect something conventional. His new exhibition, “Lari Pittman: Mood Books,” open at The Huntington through Feb. 20, 2017, does not disappoint. A room in the Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art … Continue reading

Greene & Greene in Context

Some people may remember the exquisite furniture in The Huntington’s permanent exhibition about Arts and Crafts masters Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene. The space was just reinstalled and the take-home message is clear: The Greenes did much more than simply produce gorgeous furniture. Arriving in Pasadena, Calif., in … Continue reading

Found in Translation

What does the 20th-century Arts and Crafts architecture of Americans Charles and Henry Greene have to do with the 17th-century Katsura Imperial Villa outside of Kyoto, Japan? For admirers of the work of Japanese-American photographer Yasuhiro Ishimoto (1921–2012), it turns out, quite a bit. With the opening of the exhibition … Continue reading

Geographies of Wonder

When 19th-century trappers and explorers returned from the Yellowstone region of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho, they told incredible tales of boiling mud, geysers, steaming rivers, and petrified trees. It would take the reports from several expeditions, including astonishing photographs and paintings, to confirm that these fantastical landscapes were indeed real. … Continue reading

The Flowering of Color Printing

In “The Artist’s Garden: American Impressionism and the Garden Movement, 1887–1920”—the exhibition on view in The Huntington’s MaryLou and George Boone Gallery through May 9—you can catch a glimpse of a 19th-century innovation that brightened the visual culture of the age: color lithography, or stone printing in multiple inks. Examples … Continue reading

Looking at Loved Ones

The Huntington is rightfully known for its collection of British portraits. Most of these are the product of a professional association between artist and client. For example, Thomas Gainsborough’s dazzling full-length portrait of Elizabeth Beaufoy (circa 1780), on view in the Thornton Portrait Gallery, is a flattering image of wealth … Continue reading