Coaxing Beauty

There are more than a thousand active volunteers who give back to The Huntington, whether in the library, the art galleries, or the gardens. Each volunteer brings something special to the institution and displays passion, commitment, and joy in different ways. Sandra Mader, a retired high school teacher, librarian, and … Continue reading

Growing Up Huntington

Halloween is but one of the many holidays that triggers childhood memories. For college student Galia Bar-Sever, a Halloween memory marks the beginning of a long and fruitful relationship with a place she loves. Somewhere in The Huntington, a pumpkin is being massacred. Botanical director Jim Folsom takes a discerning … Continue reading

Exhibiting Skills

Exhibiting Skills

During the first week of February, The Huntington hosted colleagues from public gardens around the country who had a common educational goal: getting more value from plants. Ten people spent a week in a workshop called “Exhibiting Skills,” building mock-ups of interactive exhibits and testing them out with visitors inside … Continue reading

Musical Imprint

Musical Imprint

Last week, the LA Opera once again brought one of its spectacular education programs for school children to The Huntington. The Magic Dream is what the LA Opera calls an “engaging celebration of Mozart’s classic opera, The Magic Flute.” More than 350 students from Rockdale Elementary School (Eagle Rock) and … Continue reading

A Taste of Art

As part of the Huntington’s education program, Maite Gomez-Rejón blends The Huntington’s art, library, and botanical collections with her love of cooking and culinary history. In her latest cooking class, “A Taste of Art: Appetizing America,” she led her students through a tour of the Scott Galleries and then the kitchen. Continue reading

A Closer Look Inside Botany

A Closer Look Inside Botany

Twenty-five volunteers gathered in the auditorium of the Botanical Center on a recent Wednesday afternoon for a lecture on plant anatomy. A slide of the apical meristem—the growing tip of the shoot—was projected on the screen as Huntington botanical educators talked about the major tissues that comprise plant organs. Continue reading