Diana W. Thompson is senior writer for the office of communications and marketing at The Huntington.

Caring for Camellias

The eastern side of the North Vista contains some of The Huntington’s oldest and most precious cultivars of camellia. William Hertrich, Henry Huntington’s superintendent of the gardens from 1903 to 1948, had a passion for the flowering plant and took advantage of San Marino’s mild winter temperatures to plant many … Continue reading

Hearing NASA’s Earth Science Satellites

As visual strategists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Dan Goods and David Delgado use art and design to explain science. Their newest project is the Orbit Pavilion sound experience, which recently opened at The Huntington. The large silver structure sits on the Celebration Lawn by the terrace of the 1919 … Continue reading

Breathing New Life into Trees

Huntington arborist Daniel Goyette first investigated the two-story-high coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) near the Boone Gallery to address concerns that its growth had slowed. Soil was built up around one side of it, and it appeared to be listing. On closer inspection, the tree doctor determined that the tree was … Continue reading

Chinese Poetry, Painting, and Gardens

Sometimes an object comes along that has so many ties to an institution’s collecting areas, it’s hard for curators to pass it up. That’s what happened in 2014, when The Huntington acquired the Ten Bamboo Studio Manual of Calligraphy and Painting 十竹齋書畫譜 (ca. 1633–1703), a remarkable example of early Chinese … Continue reading

Pittman and Maltzan’s Visual Synergy

Visitors familiar with the exuberant, colorful, and graphically complex works of Los Angeles–based artist Lari Pittman know not to expect something conventional. His new exhibition, “Lari Pittman: Mood Books,” open at The Huntington through Feb. 20, 2017, does not disappoint. A room in the Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art … Continue reading

Prized Succulents

The Huntington recently acquired a collection of rare succulents from the late Gerald Barad (1923–2016) of Flemington, New Jersey. Participants at the Philadelphia Flower Show knew Barad as the guy who cultivated the stunning cacti and other succulents that grabbed top ribbons year after year. The beach ball–sized specimen he grew … Continue reading

Seeing to It

Chicago-based collage artist Candace Hunter first started reading Octavia Butler’s speculative fiction as an undergraduate. Themes from Butler’s writing permeated Hunter’s work through the years and reached a pinnacle with the opening this summer of her solo show in Milwaukee, “So Be It. See To It,” based on Butler’s stories. In … Continue reading

Greene & Greene in Context

Some people may remember the exquisite furniture in The Huntington’s permanent exhibition about Arts and Crafts masters Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene. The space was just reinstalled and the take-home message is clear: The Greenes did much more than simply produce gorgeous furniture. Arriving in Pasadena, Calif., in … Continue reading